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Gum Treatment & Surgeries

Gum disease refers to inflammation of the soft tissue (gingiva) and abnormal loss of bone that surrounds the teeth and holds them in place. Gum disease is the second most common cause of toothache.
If you notice any of the following signs of gum disease, schedule an appointment immediately:

    • gums that bleed when you brush your teeth
    • red, swollen or tender gums
    • gums that have pulled away from the teeth
    • bad breath that doesn't go away
    • pus between your teeth and gums
    • loose teeth
    • a change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
    • a change in the fit of partial dentures

 

Gum disease is caused by toxins secreted by bacteria in "plaque" that accumulate over time along the gum line. This plaque is a mixture of food, saliva, and bacteria.

Treatment options available-
1. Non-Surgical Therapy

Scaling and Root Planing: Manually removing the plaque and tarter from the root surfaces of your teeth below the gum line.
Antibiotics: Because bacteria cause periodontitis antibiotics may be prescribed as pills or as an Antibiotic fiber. The fibers are used in conjunction with scaling and root planing. They are placed directly into the pockets and are removed within 7-10 days later. Antibacterial mouth rinses may also be recommended to help plaque control.
Bite correction: An imbalanced bite may accelerate bone destruction. Your teeth may be adjusted for proper and better function. A Bite-guard (removable retainer fitting over teeth) may be required to protect teeth surfaces and relax tense muscles.
Splinting: This technique attaches weak teeth together, combining them into a stronger single unit, making them more stable and offering more comfortable chewing.

2. Surgical Therapy

Flap Surgery:
Our periodontist separates the gum from the teeth creating a "flap" and accesses the infected pocket. It aims to reduce pocket depth and increase the ability to maintain the remnant pockets clean.

Gingivectomy: This procedure is performed when excess amounts of gum growth around the teeth have occurred. This results in false pocket formation and the inability to keep them clean.
Osseous (bone) surgery: This procedure is done to smooth shallow craters and defects in the bone due to mild or moderate bone loss.

Guided Tissue Regeneration: This procedure is done in combination with a surgical flap operation where gum growth into a defect is barriered off to allow slower growing bone, cementum and ligament cells to populate a bony defect.

Bone Grafts: Tiny fragments of the patient's bone, synthetic bone or bone obtained from a bone bank are used to fill a bony defect around the teeth. These grafts act as a scaffold on or around which patients own bone is conducted or induced to grow.

Soft Tissue Graft: In cases of gum recession a graft is usually taken from the palate and transplanted onto the receding area to reinforce the thin gum and to inhibit further gum recession.

Flap and Bone Surgery

When gum is inflamed severely (periodontitis), alveolar bone will be absorbed, and defected. Periodontal ligaments which connect between the alveolar bone and the teeth will disappear. Sever bone lose will cause tooth moving and missing. Flap and bone surgery is order to contour the bone, deeply clean the tooth to reduce the inflammation, and promote bone re-growing and connections firm.
Detailed Procedures



  1. Presurgical bone defect. Gum inflamed and reddish.
  2. Flap incision to make gum retracted, and the bone shows out.
  3. The bone is contoured, and remain tartar is removed.
  4. Gum is sutured back.
  5. After periodontal surgery, the bone defect disappears, and gum becomes healthy pink color.

Prevention

What can I do to avoid periodontal disease?


To keep your teeth for a lifetime, you must remove the plaque from your teeth and gums every day with proper brushing and flossing. Regular dental visits are also important. Daily cleaning will help keep calculus formation to a minimum, but it won't completely prevent it. A professional cleaning at least twice a year is necessary to remove calculus from places your toothbrush and floss may have missed. Other factors can affect the health of your gums.

I'm over 55. Does this mean I'm more likely to get periodontal disease?

Your chances of developing periodontal disease increase considerably as you get older. More than half of people aged 55 and older have periodontitis. The good news is that research suggests that these higher rates may be related to risk factors other than age. So, periodontal disease is not an inevitable part of aging. Risk factors that may make older people more susceptible include general health status, diminished immune status, medications, depression, worsening memory, diminished salivary flow, functional impairments and change in financial status.

When should I see a periodontist?

If you value your oral as well as overall health, anytime is a good time to see a periodontist for a periodontal evaluation.
Sometimes the only way to detect periodontal disease is through a periodontal evaluation. A periodontal evaluation may be especially important in the following situations:
o    If you notice any symptoms of periodontal disease, including:

  • gums that bleed easily, such as during brushing or flossing
  • red, swollen or tender gums
  • gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • persistent bad breath
  • pus between the teeth and gums
  • loose or separating teeth
  • a change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite

o    If you are thinking of becoming pregnant. Pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be seven times more likely to have a baby born too early and too small. In addition, about half of women experience "pregnancy gingivitis." However, women who have good oral hygiene and have no gingivitis before pregnancy are very unlikely to experience this condition.

o    If you have a family member with periodontal disease. Research suggests that the bacteria that cause periodontal disease can pass through saliva. This means the common contact of saliva in families puts children and couples at risk for contracting the periodontal disease of another family member.

o    If you have heart disease, diabetes, respiratory disease or osteoporosis. Ongoing research is showing that periodontal disease may be linked to these conditions. The bacteria associated with periodontal disease can travel into the blood stream and pose a threat to other parts of the body. Healthy gums may lead to a healthier body.

o    If you feel that your teeth are too short or that your smile is too "gummy." Or, if you are missing one or more of your teeth and are interested in a long-lasting replacement option.

o    If you are not satisfied with your current tooth replacement option, such as a bridge or dentures, and may be interested in dental implants.

o    have a sore or irritation in your mouth that does not get better within two weeks.

What can I expect the first time I visit a periodontist?


During your first visit, your periodontist will review your complete medical and dental history with you. It's extremely important for your periodontist to know if you are taking any medications or being treated for any condition that can affect your periodontal care. You will be given a complete oral and periodontal exam. Your periodontist will examine your gums, check to see if there is any gum line recession, assess how your teeth fit together when you bite and check your teeth to see if any are loose. Your periodontist will also take a small measuring instrument and place it between your teeth and gums to determine the depth of those spaces, known as periodontal pockets. This helps your periodontist assess the health of your gums. Radiographs (x-rays) may be used to show the bone levels between your teeth to check for possible bone loss.

What is Flap and Bone Surgery?

When gum is inflamed severely (periodontitis), alveolar bone will be absorbed, and defected. Periodontal ligaments which connect between the alveolar bone and the teeth will disappear. Sever bone lose will cause tooth moving and missing. Flap and bone surgery is order to contour the bone, deeply clean the tooth to reduce the inflammation, and promote bone re-growing and connections firm.

To avoid gum disease, get the scaling & polishing of your teeth done every 6 months. Please contact us to setup an appointment for a checkup.

    • gums that bleed when you brush your teeth
    • red, swollen or tender gums
    • gums that have pulled away from the teeth
    • bad breath that doesn't go away
    • pus between your teeth and gums
    • loose teeth
    • a change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
    • a change in the fit of partial dentures